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Electrifying Cultures: Standardization vs. Diversity in Histories of Artefact and Experiment

///Electrifying Cultures: Standardization vs. Diversity in Histories of Artefact and Experiment

Electrifying Cultures: Standardization vs. Diversity in Histories of Artefact and Experiment

Conference URL: http://www.hps.leeds.ac.uk/HPSNews/ElectrifyingCultures.htm Location: Devonshire Hall, University of Leeds, 10-12 September 2006 (http://www.universallyleeds.co.uk//maps/Devonshire2pp.pdf )

Sponsored by the International Electrotechnical Commission, founded 1906 ********** 50 years of History & Philosophy of Science at Leeds **********

This conference explores the themes of homogeneity and heterogeneity in the electrified cultures of the modern world (1750-2000): computing, experimentation, lighting, medicine, power and telecommunications. Papers offer fresh perspectives on the history and historiography of electricity in Europe , America and Asia , raising key questions about the cultural and political interaction of bodies, artefacts, systems, practices, theories and expertise. For twenty first century scholarship that looks beyond assumptions of consensus and closure, this meeting reconsiders the many-levelled symbiosis of diversity and standardization in both the laboratory and the public domain.

Registration deadline: 30 June 2006 Registration forms can be downloaded from: http://www.hps.leeds.ac.uk/HPSNews/IECregistrationform.rtf http://www.hps.leeds.ac.uk/HPSNews/IECregistrationform.pdf

SPEAKERS and provisional paper titles:

Efstathios Arapostathis (University of Oxford) A.B.W Kennedy in the Electric Light and Power Industry, 1889-1914: Cases of Expertise, Practices and Style

Paola Bertucci (University of Bologna) Electric Conversations: shocks and attractions for public and private Enlightenment

Christine Blondel (CNRS, Cité des sciences et de l’industrie, Paris) The ‘universal vogue’ of medical electricity in France at the turn of 20 th century: electrical artefacts as boundary objects between physicists, physicians, instrument makers, electrical engineers and consumers.

Hasok Chang (University College London) The standardisation of electrolysis

Chris Chilvers (Technical University of Denmark) Was submarine telegraphy the great imperial project?

John Christie (University of Leeds)

[On Benjamin Franklin – title TBA]

Graeme Gooday (University of Leeds) Electrifying history: rethinking conformity and diversity in cultures of technoscience

Hans-Georg Hofer (University of Freiburg) Collecting Objects, Picturing Bodies: Towards a Cultural History of ‘Electropathology’

Bruce J. Hunt (University of Texas) Cable Telegraphy, Electrical Measurement, and the Evolution of Maxwell’s Field Theory

Sungook Hong (Seoul National University) Power, Wonder and Suspicion: The Cultural Meaning of Electricity in Korea , 1885-1910.

Akiko Ito (University of Minnesota) The virtue of uselessness-the rise and fall of the electrotherapist in early twentieth century Japan

Annie Jamieson (University of Leeds) More Than Meets The Eye: Challenging the Historiography of the Medical X-Ray, 1896-1914

Peter C. Kjærgaard (University of Århus) Visions of an Electric Future

Stephen Lax (University of Leeds) ‘Leaving it to the engineers’ – the emergence of standards for digital radio broadcasting

Iwan Morus (University of Aberystwyth) Fitting Physics to the Body

Christopher Otter (New York University) Electrifying Perception: Colour, Distance and Detail, 1875-1900

Chitra Ramalingam (Harvard University) Portrait of a spark: electricity and the invisible at the birth of microphysics

Karen Sayer (Trinity & All Saints College, Leeds) Landscapes of Light

H. Otto Sibum (Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, Berlin) What is that thing called energy?

James Sumner (University of Manchester) Subcultures against standards: transferability versus ‘deep control’ among British microcomputer users

Special guest speaker: Ronnie Amit, Chief Executive of the IEC

Commentators: Geoffrey Cantor (University of Leeds) Anna Guagnini (University of Bologna) Greg Radick (University of Leeds)

Contact: Programme enquiries email: Graeme Gooday, [email protected]

Registration enquiries email: Leucha Veneer, [email protected]

By | 2017-11-10T10:01:41+00:00 December 13th, 2010|Conferences, Symposia & Workshops|Comments Off on Electrifying Cultures: Standardization vs. Diversity in Histories of Artefact and Experiment

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