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MAKING HEALTH, MAKING RACE: HISTORICAL APPROACHES TO RACE, MEDICINE AND PUBLIC HEALTH

///MAKING HEALTH, MAKING RACE: HISTORICAL APPROACHES TO RACE, MEDICINE AND PUBLIC HEALTH

MAKING HEALTH, MAKING RACE: HISTORICAL APPROACHES TO RACE, MEDICINE AND PUBLIC HEALTH

MAKING HEALTH, MAKING RACE: HISTORICAL APPROACHES TO RACE, MEDICINE AND PUBLIC HEALTH

University of Texas at Austin November 13-15, 2008

Questions about the shared quality of life and the distribution of health care are part of our shared historical experience. Across the Americas, medicine is an important economic sector, and access to health care is also a key dimension of both citizenship and exclusion. Medical historians have explored the ways public health and medicine have shaped the ideologies and institutions that shape racial inequality, the experience of slavery and freedom, as well as the minimum conditions for citizenship and personal dignity. Historians and scholars in African American Studies, Latino Studies and Gender Studies have explored the ways men and women in communities of color have shaped and challenged the institutions of public health and medicine.

Given the growth of shared thematic interests across these various disciplinary fields and geographic areas, this is one of the few conferences where scholars interested in the intersection of race and the social history of medicine can interact with scholars with similar research interests who work on places outside the United States. Making Race, Making Health will help establish a face-to-face moment in the establishment of cross-hemispheric research network in the history of medicine.

Thursday, November 13th, 2008 Opening Reception and Keynote Address, Thompson Conference Center Lobby, 6:00-9:00 pm

David Oshinsky, Jack S. Blanton Chair and Distinguished Teaching Professor, Department of History, University of Texas at Austin — Author of Pulitzer Prize winning Polio: An American Story

Friday, November 14th, 2008 Continental Breakfast, Thompson Conference Center West Lobby, 8:00-8:45

Panel 1: Criminalizing Illness and Constructing Deviance in Cuba and the United States, 9:00-10:30

“Caught Between Disease and Crime: Chinese Immigrants and Racial Gatekeeping in Early-Twentieth-Century Cuba,” José Amador de Jesús, Department of History, Miami University of Ohio

“When Immunity Goes Abroad, Disease Comes Home: White and Black Southerners in the Occupation of Cuba Libre, 1898-1914,” Sherri Harper Charleston, Department of History, University of Michigan—Ann Arbor

“Protest Psychosis: Race, Stigma, and the Diagnosis of Schizophrenia,” Jonathan M. Metzl, Department of Psychiatry and the Women’s Studies Program, University of Michigan—Ann Arbor

Chair and comment: Martin Summers, Department of History, University of Texas at Austin

Panel 2: On the Margins: Public Health Campaigns as State Projects, 10:45-12:15

“‘Indian Tuberculosis’: Racial Politics and Public Health Crises in Early-Twentieth-Century Canada,” Jane Whalen, Department of History, Wilfrid Laurier University

“Cleaning up the ‘Dirty Rivas’: Health, Hygiene, and the Modern Migrant,” Verónica Martínez-Matsuda, Department of History, University of Texas at Austin

“The Political Ecology of Hookworm Disease and the Challenges of Race and Nation in Twentieth-Century Panamá,” Samuel Roberts, Departments of History and Sociomedical Sciences, Columbia University

Chair and comment: Natalia Molina, Department of Ethnic Studies and the Urban Studies and Planning Program, University of California, San Diego

Lunch, TCC 3.102, 12:15-1:30

Panel 3: Race and the Production of Medical Knowledge: Transnational and Comparative Approaches, 1:45-3:15

“The Tlahualilo Exodus of 1895: The Mexican Border, the Calculus of Fitness and the Boundaries of Civil Rights,” John McKiernan-Gonzalez, Department of History, University of Texas at Austin

“Indian Skulls and African American Organs: Emancipation and the Biomedical Reconstruction of Race,” Nancy Bercaw, Department of History, University of Mississippi

“Racial Politics and Soldiers’ Bodies: World War II Mustard Gas Experiments in Transnational Perspective,” Susan L. Smith, Department of History and Classics, University of Alberta

Chair and comment: Laura Briggs, Department of Women’s Studies, University of Arizona

Plenary panel: Voice and Agency in the History of Race and Medicine, 3:30-5:00

Vanessa Northington Gamble, Department of History, George Washington University

Leslie Reagan, Department of History, University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign

Susan Reverby, Department of Women’s Studies, Wellesley College

Saturday, November 15th, 2008 Continental Breakfast, Thompson Conference Center West Lobby, 8:00-8:30

Plenary panel: Transnationalism and Diaspora in the History of Race and Medicine, 8:30-10:00

Lundy Braun, Departments of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine and Africana Studies, Brown University

Laura Briggs, Department of Women’s Studies, University of Arizona

Natalia Molina, Department of Ethnic Studies and the Urban Studies and Planning Program, University of California, San Diego

Chair: John Mckiernan-Gonzalez, Department of History, University of Texas at Austin.

Panel 4: Black http://nosubhealth.com Health and Healing in Slavery and Freedom, 10:15-11:45

“Bodies of Encounter: Health, Death and Salvation in Early-Modern Cartagena de Indias,” Pablo Gomez, Department of History, Vanderbilt University

“A Culture of Cleanliness: Hygiene in the African Diaspora and Perceptions of Race and Civilization,” Kevin Dawson, Department of History, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

“‘I can’t write you the history I give you a sketch’: Jon Donalson and the Austin Freedmen’s Bureau,” Gretchen Long, Department of History, Williams College

Chair and Comment: James Sidbury, Department of History, University of Texas at Austin

Lunch/Panel 5: Dispatches from the Field: Teaching Race, Medicine and Health, 12:00-1:20

“Navigating the ‘Race Course’: Teaching Science, Medicine, and Race to Undergraduates,” Richard Keller and Judith Houck, Departments of Medical History and Bioethics and the History of Science, University of Wisconsin—Madison

“Teaching Community Participatory Research on Health Disparities: An Experimental Seminar,” Laura Lein, Departments of Social Work and Anthropology, University of Texas at Austin

Chair: Martin Summers, Department of History, University of Texas at Austin

Panel 6: Popular Healing and Professional Medicine in the Spanish and American Empires, 1:30-3:00

“Spanish, Indigenous, and Mixed Race Curanderos and Their Cures in Enlightened Michoacán,” Verónica Vallejo, Department of History, Georgetown University

“Curing the Nations with Cacti: Epidemics, Race, and Local Healing Practices in Nineteenth-Century Texas,” Mark Allan Goldberg, Department of History, University of Wisconsin—Madison

“Making Babies, Making Race: Racialized Reproductive Health in Early-Twentieth Century New Mexico,” Lena McQuade, Department of Women’s and Gender Studies, Sonoma State University

Chair and Comment: Jorge Canizares-Esguerra, Department of History, University of Texas at Austin

Panel 7: Race, Medicine, and the Politics of Reproduction, 3:15-5:00

“Caregiver or Contagion: Brazilian Medicine versus the Mae Preta,” Okezi T. Otovo, Department of History, Georgetown University

“‘. . . For the benefit of the planters and the benefit of Mankind . . .’: The Struggle to Control Midwives and Obstetrics on St. Croix, Danish West Indies, 1818-1848,” Niklas Thode Jensen, Department of History, University of Copenhagen

“Race, Eugenics and Maternity Service in Colonial Vietnam, 1900-1945,” Thuy Linh Nguyen, Department of History, University of Pennsylvania

“‘Two Dimes a Day’: Saving Babies and Mothers, from Guatemalan Villages to Memphis Neighborhoods,” Laurie Green, Department of History, University of Texas at Austin

Chair and Comment: Megan Seaholm, Department of History, University of Texas at Austin

Closing Remarks, 5:00-5:30

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