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The “object” of early modern science

///The “object” of early modern science

The “object” of early modern science

Call for Papers (NACBS): The “object” of early modern science

Location: MarylandUnited States
Call for Papers Deadline: 2010-01-31
NACBS Roundtable Proposal: The “Object” of Early Modern Science

This roundtable (4 papers) will treat the question of early modern scientific methods and instruments, particularly uses of a technology by which an object is examined, rendered, or recognized as scientifically significant. For example, papers might consider microscopes, medical instruments, or measuring devices. But the paper should also be focused on the particular object of study. Does the object under examination change through different technologies? Do different technologies yield different understandings of the same object? Are these understandings politically, ideologically, culturally inflected? How does that inflection temper our understandings of “science?”

But papers could also “object” to the ways that early modern science is currently framed in the discipline. What do we need to consider now in order to understand science then? Are there helpful (or less helpful) ways of considering the idea of “objectivity?”

(“Early Modern” here is broadly defined; papers pre-1800 or so will be considered)

Please send a 300-word abstract and brief CV by January 31, 2010 to: [email protected]

North American Conference on British Studies (NACBS)
Baltimore, MD
November 12-14, 2010

Erika Olbricht 
Department of English 
Guilford House 
Case Western Reserve University 
Cleveland, OH 44106
Email: [email protected]
By | 2017-11-10T09:58:02+00:00 December 16th, 2010|Conferences, Symposia & Workshops|Comments Off on The “object” of early modern science

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