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Third Annual Graduate and Post-Doctoral Student Symposium

///Third Annual Graduate and Post-Doctoral Student Symposium

Third Annual Graduate and Post-Doctoral Student Symposium

Third Annual Graduate and Post-Doctoral Student Symposium

Washington Society for the History of Medicine
National Library of Medicine, History of Medicine Division
Office of History, National Institutes of Health

8 May 2009
9:00am-5:00pm
Lister Hill Visitors Center,
8600 Rockville Pike, Bldg. 38A
National Institutes of Health
Bethesda MD
Symposium website: http://wshmdc.blogspot.com/

Third Annual Graduate and Post-Doctoral Student Symposium

Plenary Speaker: Susan E. Lederer, University of Wisconsin-Madison.

The Baltimore-Washington, DC metropolitan area boasts a rich array of
historians, sociologists and anthropologists of medicine and biomedical
science.  These scholars work at more than a dozen different local
universities and colleges, as well as in museums, libraries, fellowship
programs, and departments of the federal government. Yet most of
us–especially graduate students and non-academic scholars–don’t know
each other well.  Many graduate students and scholars at smaller
institutions feel isolated and out of touch.

To remedy this, the Washington Society for the History of Medicine, in
conjunction with the History of Medicine Division of the National
Library of Medicine and the Office of History, National Institutes of
Health, is organizing a special event for graduate and post-doctoral
students interested in the history of medicine and biomedical sciences
to get together with other scholars in the field, and with each other,
to discuss our research projects and interests, professional issues of
concern, and area resources.

Registration is free. Lunch, refreshments and snacks will be provided.
Space is limited, so please register early. To register, send contact
information, areas of scholarly interest, by email to Judy Chelnick
[email protected].

The NIH campus is accessible by car, bus and metro (Medical Center stop
on the Red Line).  To enter the NIH participants will need
government-issue photo ID.  For further visitor information:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/about/visitor.html

PROGRAM

8.30-9.00  Coffee

9.00 -9.15 Introductions
Leo Slater, Vice-President, Washington Society for the History of
Medicine.
Elizabeth Fee, Chief, History of Medicine Division, National Library of
Medicine.
David Cantor, Deputy Director, Office of History, National Institutes of
Health.

9.15-10.15  Plenary
Susan E. Lederer, University of Wisconsin, Madison.
Not My Type?  Blood Types, Identity and Ambivalence in 20th Century
America

10.15-10.30 Coffee

10.30-12.00   Being a Graduate Student
Practical aspects of graduate work.  How to plan your thesis: what to
do, what not to do.  What makes a good advisor?  When your advisor is
never available, runs off to another university.  From the perspectives
of advisors, post-docs, and graduate students.

Alan M. Kraut, Department of History, American University.
Laura Stark, Stetten Fellow, Office of History, National Institutes of
Health.
Stanley J. Reiser, Clinical Professor of Health Care Sciences and of
Health Policy, The George Washington University School of Medicine and
Health Sciences.

12.00-1.15  Lunch

1.15-2.45  How to Turn a Thesis into a Book
What’s the difference between a thesis and a book?  How to plan the
transition.  From the perspectives of publishers, advisors, those who
made the transition, and those who hope to.

Doreen Valentine, Senior Editor, Science, Technology, Health & Medicine,
and the Environment, Rutgers University Press.
Michael Sappol, Curator-Historian, History of Medicine Division,
National Library of Medicine.
John Parascandola, Book series editor, Healing Society: Disease,
Medicine, and History, Praeger Publishers.

2.45-3.15 Coffee

3.15-4.45  Getting Grants
How to get grant money.  What do grants agencies want?  What not to do.
>From the perspectives of reviewers, grants managers, and those who want
their money.

David Cantor, Deputy Director, Office of History, National Institutes of
Health.
Frederick Kronz, Program Officer, Science, Technology, and Society
(STS), National Science Foundation, Washington DC.
Maggie Dennis, Historian and Fellowship Coordinator, Jerome and Dorothy
Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation, National
Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC.

5.00  Retire to the Rock-Bottom Brewery, Bethesda.

By | 2017-11-10T09:58:55+00:00 December 16th, 2010|Conferences, Symposia & Workshops|Comments Off on Third Annual Graduate and Post-Doctoral Student Symposium

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