DNA Cycle Path, Cambridge, England

By Susannah Gibson

DNA cyclepath to Shelford

Cambridge, a city known for its abundant bicycles and cutting edge scientific research, has finally found a way to combine these two things… In 2005, as a celebration of the 10,000th mile of the national cycle network, Cambridgeshire County Council and Sustrans joined forces with the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute to create a DNA-inspired cycle path. The path, which runs from Addenbrooke’s Hospital to Great Shelford, is decorated with 10,257 colourful stripes which represent the four nucleotides of the BRCA2 gene.

BRCA2 (Breast Cancer Type 2 susceptibility protein) was discovered at the Sanger Institute by Prof. Michael Stratton and Dr Richard Wooster in 1995. This tumor suppressor gene binds to and regulates another protein to mend DNA breaks. Mutations of this gene produce short proteins that are unable to repair broken DNA and can lead to the development of various cancers. BRCA2 is just one of the 30,000 genes in the human genome; if the entire human genome were laid down at the same scale, the path would circle Earth about ten time.

DNA Helix, Cambridge
DNA Helix, Cambridge, by Elena The. Image used with author's permission.

As it is, the path runs alongside a railway for two miles through the flat countryside of south Cambridgeshire and has become a popular commuter route since being opened by Nobel Prize winner Sir John Sulston.

Each end of the path is marked by a sculpture of the DNA double helix magnified 750,000,000 times. To find the first sculpture and begin your cycle to Great Shelford, follow the signposts dotted around the Addenbrooke’s site.

Video of the route

Map of the route


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